Home  |  What's New  |  Features  |  Gallery  |  Reviews  |  Reference  |  Forum  |

Tachikawa Ki-94 II
Japanese High-Altitude Interceptor

 

RS Models, 1/72 scale

S u m m a r y

Catalogue Number: RS Models No 92019 - Tachikawa Ki-94 II
Scale: 1/72
Contents and Media: 52 short-run tan coloured plastic parts on two sprues, 2 resin parts, 1 clear injected plastic canopy, 1 Eduard PE fret (non-coloured), decals for two prototypes plus an A5 sized two page instruction sheet with history, parts plan, 16 build diagrams but no paint/decal guide except for that on the rear of the box.
Price: From £16.60 available online from Hannants and specialist hobby retailers worldwide.
Review Type: FirstLook
Advantages: Remarkably good moulding for a short-run kit, interesting subject, good detail inside and out, excellent PE, resin, clear parts and decals.
Disadvantages: There are a couple of stencils on the decal sheet but no guide to show where they go.
Recommendation: Highly Recommended for IJAAF or Prototype enthusiasts, and for those into Axis 1946


Reviewed by Glen Porter


HyperScale is proudly supported by Squadron.com
 

Background

 

The Tachikawa KI-94 II was designed late in the Second World War as a high-altitude interceptor specifically to combat B-29s.

With a supposedly laminar flow wing, six bladed prop driven by a 2400 hp 18 cylinder turbocharged engine giving an estimated top speed of around 422 MPH and a ceiling of 14,680 m, this would have been some performer indeed but as far as I can tell, it never actually flew. The six bladed prop for the first prototype was not ready so a four bladed example was ordered to be fitted for testing and, although a second prototype was under construction, the war ended before anything could happen.

With a span of 14m and a length of 12m this was a big aeroplane.

 

 

FirstLook



My only exposure to RS Models was when our Editor showed me their Dornier Do 17P that he reviewed previously on HyperScale. I must say I was very impressed.

This kit is equally good.

For a short-run kit, the tan coloured plastic sprues are very well moulded with small sprue attachments, crisp and clean panel detail and only a hint of flash plus some ejector pin stubs to clean up on a few parts.

 

Click the thumbnails below to view larger images:

[../../../photogallery/photo00013962/real.htm]

The main sprue carries the two fuselage halves, interior tub halves, wheel well inserts, under carriage legs, doors and wheel halves, engine fan, optional spinners and backing plates and optional under-nose air-intakes. The other sprue has the three-piece main wing, tail-plane, optional six or four bladed prop, cockpit floor, seat and instrument panel. Both of these sprues are in a tan plastic similar to some of Eduardís mouldings.

The one-piece injection moulded canopy is very cleanly moulded although its a little cloudy, and could probably do with a dip in Future.

 



Two resin parts are flawlessly cast, as you would expect from a model company that also produces complete resin kits.

 



Eduard PE is not coloured and contains most of the interior parts including an optional seat.

The small decal sheet supplies marking for two prototypes only and are nicely printed with good register, colour density and minimum carrier film.

Click the thumbnails below to view larger images:

[../../../photogallery/photo00005149/real.htm]

There are a small amount of stencils but there is nothing in the kit to indicate where to place them including the box-top art-work.

 

Conclusion



As a newcomer to this company's products, I must say I am very impressed. Their website does not list a huge range of kits but going by this and the Dornier, RS Modelsí quality is quite high - at least as good at least as MPM.

Highly Recommended.

Thanks to RS Models for the sample


Review Text Copyright © 2007 by Glen Porter
Page Created 28 August, 2007
Last updated 24 December, 2007

Back to HyperScale Main Page

Back to Reviews Page