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Mosquito B. Mk. IV

Revell, 1/48 scale

S u m m a r y

Catalogue Number:

Revell kit number 04555 - Mosquito B. Mk. IV

Scale: 1/48
Contents and Media:

196 pale blue grey plastic parts; 21 parts in clear plastic; markings for three aircraft

Price:

From GBP£14.46 available online from Hannants website
and hobby retailers worldwide

Review Type: FirstLook
Advantages: Crisply engraved surface features; very high level of detail; fully fitted out bomb bay with separate doors; plenty of options including alternative drop tanks, propellers, wheel hubs, canopy parts and piles of ordnance; positionable control surfaces; basic engine parts included; high quality decals.
Disadvantages: Some sink marks and ejector pins; bulbous spinners.
Conclusion: With this release, Revell has delivered the best detailed Mosquito in any scale.


Reviewed by Brett Green


Revell's 1/48 scale Mosquito B. Mk. IV will be available online from Squadron.com

 

FirstLook

 

Revell has released a new-tool 1/48 scale Mosquito B. Mk. IV bomber.

Athough Revell has been known to re-box other manufacturers' kits, this Mosquito is indeed a brand new offering comprising 196 parts in pale blue-grey plastic; 21 parts in clear and markings for three aircraft.

The quality of the mouldings are generally very high with crisply recessed panel lines and selected rows of rivets where appropriate. Of course, the fuselge and wings of the "Wooden Wonder" were largely smooth and the kit parts reflect this. There are a few sink marks and ejector pin circles that will need to be dealt with (for example on the forward fuselage, landing gear struts and crew door).

 

  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV Review by Brett Green: Image
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Parts breakdown is sensible, with large spars provided to ensure a robust fit and perfect dihedral for the wings and horizontal tail planes. Interestingly, the nacelle parts are completely separate from the wings, and the fuselage is split into front and rear halves. This suggests that we might see fighter and two-stage Merlin variants in the future. Fingers crossed!

Detail is excellent. The cockpit is busily fitted out with seats - raised harnesses are moulded in place - a positionable interior hatch, instrument panel, radios and sundry boxes.

Interior detail extends into the bomb bay too, which is equipped with structural detail, separate racks and ordnance. The bomb bay doors are moulded as one piece, but they may be sliced open along the centreline if you wish to display the contents. Two observation windows are moulded into the doors too. The wheel wells continue the interior detail story.

Revell also supplies the basic block, reduction gear, wheel case and mounts for two Rolls-Royce Merlin engines. The side cowlings are moulded shut, but once again these may be sliced open to display the engines. If you do not want to display the engines, they do not need to be installed as the exhausts may be fitted from the inside of the cowlings.

Control surfaces are all separate, including the flaps. The inner and outer sections of the flaps are joined by a plastic bar. The ailerons, elevators and rudder may be attached without glue and left workable.

Optional parts abound. We are offered the choice of narrow or broad chord propeller blades, different wheel hubs, optional wing-mounted racks and bombs, poseable entry hatch and ladder, wing tip aerials, and retracted or extended landing gear. Both 50 gallon and 100 gallon wing tanks are also included.

Clear parts are thin and sparkling. The canopy side blisters are separate parts, so some care will be required when securing these to the main canopy. Front and rear wing tip navigation lights are supplied as separate clear parts.

 

 

Instructions are called out in a 16 page booklet over 70 illustrated steps.

The shapes of the aiframe look good, and the height of the fin/rudder matches SAM Publications' plans in Richard Franks' "The De Havilland Mosquito - A Comprehensive Guide for the Modeller". The only real peculiarity is the shape of the spinners, which look far too bulbous to my eye. I will probably replace mine with the more streamlined Airfix spinners.

The main wheels are a bit too tall and skinny too, which will look a little odd on the finished model. The good news is that the overall height of the undercarriage is almost identical to the Airfix kit, and stance of the completed model looks fine (see Diedrich Wiegmann's Revell Mosquito in HyperScale's Gallery).

 

 

Markings are supplied for three aircraft:

  • Mosquito B.Mk.IV, 627 Sqn RAF, Oakington, January 1944 finished in Ocean Grey and Dark Green upper surfaces with Night below.

  • Mosquito B.Mk.IV, 109 Sqn RAF, Marham, January 1944 finished in Ocean Grey and Dark Green upper surfaces with Night below.

  • Mosquito B.Mk.IV, 105 Sqn RAF, Marham, June 1943 finished in Ocean Grey and Dark Green upper surfaces with Medium Sea Grey below.

An altenate decal instrument panel is supplied on the sheet, as is a set of decal harnesses to supplement the raised moulded straps. I also like the inclusion of curved stripes for the nose of the bombs - nice touch.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Tamiya's 1/48 scale Mosquito is undoubtedly a nice kit and supremely easy to build, but Revell should be congratulated for offering a worthy alternative.

The new Revell 1/48 scale Mosquito B.Mk.IV will certainly require a bit more effort to build, but it offers better cockpit detail, two engines, poseable / workable control surfaces and a stack of ordnance and optional parts.

The two shortcomings - main wheels and spinners - can be robbed from the old Airfix kit. Alternatively, resin wheels are available from True Details and Aires, and the after-market is sure to come to the rescue with new spinners soon.

All this is delivered at a very reasonable £15.00 in the UK - less than the price of the decades-old Airfix kit!

Thanks to Revell for the sample


Text and Images Copyright 2009 by Brett Green
This Page Created on 5 February, 2009
Last updated 6 February, 2009

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