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"The Sound of Silence"

MiG-21PFM & A-4E Skyhawk
Limited Edition Dual Combo

Eduard, 1/48 scale

S u m m a r y

Catalogue Number: Eduard Kit No. 11101X - "The Sound of Silence" MiG-21PFM & A-4E Skyhawk Limited Edition Dual Combo
Scale: 1/48
Contents and Media:

Two complete kits:

MiG-21PFM - 372 parts in medium grey plastic ; 26 parts in clear; self-adhesive masks; two photo-etched frets (one coloured)

A-4E Skyhawk - 172 parts in light grey plastic (45 marked not for use); 13 parts in clear (2 marked not for use); one colour photo-etched fret; printed acetate film (gunsight reflectors); two parts in grey resin.

Common parts - pre-cut canopy masks; decal sheet with one subject per aircraft; artwork by Koike Shigeo

Price: USD$88.00 plus shipping available online from Eduard's website
and specialist hobby retailers worldwide
Review Type: FirstLook
Advantages: High level of detail; restrained surface texture; straightforward parts breakdown; excellent quality decals.
Disadvantages:  
Conclusion:

This is a pleasing package - Eduard's unique take on the "dogfight doubles" concept that now includes two great kits plus attractive artwork from Koike Shigeo.

In terms of accuracy and surface textures, the Hasegawa Skyhawk remains a very good kit despite its vintage. The additon of Eduard colour photo-etch plus the resin seat lifts the cockpit several notches in the detail department; while the MiG-21PFM, along with the rest of the Eduard Fishbed family, still stands head and shoulders above other MiG-21s in this scale.

It is nice to see them together in the one box.

Highly Recommended.


Reviewed by Brett Green


Eduard's 1/48 scale Focke-Wulf Fw 190 D-9 is available online from Squadron.com
 

Introduction

 

Eduard's "EduArt" series combines two models with attractive box art by Koike Shigeo, plus a frameable print of the artwork in the box.

The most recent releaset in the series is "The Sound Of Silence". This pairs Eduard's 1/48 scale MiG-21PFM with the venerable Hasegawa A-4E Skyhawk.

 

 

The MiG-21PFM was released in 2013 and represents state-of-the-art standard. Surface detail is top class, detail excellent, and it is a straightforward build with excellent fit. It's accurate too - a very impressive package.

By comparsion, considering it was originally released in 2000 and represents an earlier generation, the Hasegawa Scooter stands up very well in terms of quality of fine surface textures and accuracy, but you'll need a bit more focus when it comes to assembly.

Let's take a more detailed look at both models.

 

 

FirstLook

 

MiG-21PFM

Eduard's 1/48 scale MiG-21PFM comprises 372 parts in medium grey plastic, 26 parts in clear, and two photo-etched frets (one coloured)

Compared to the initial MiG-21MF release, there are three new sprues containing parts for the second-generation fuselage, spine, tail planes and wings.

 

 

The two photo-etched frets are also specific to the MiG-21PFM.

 

 

The MiG-21PFM meets the same exemplary stanrdards as its predecessors. The surface detail is restrained and crisp, detail is fantastic - I particularly like the use of the colour photo-etched parts in the cockpit - and engineering is world-class. The inclusion of self-adhesive canopy masks is always a nice touch.

The transparent sprue is the same as its predecessors, but the specific parts for the second generation canopy and windscreen are options.

 

 

All of the plastic ordnance supplied in the MF kit are also provided with the PFM, so you will have a big bonus for your spares box too.


 

A-4E Skyhawk

Hasegawa's A-4E Skyhawk sprues are made up from 172 parts in light grey plastic (45 marked not for use) and 13 parts in clear (2 marked not for use). Eduard has added one colour photo-etched fret, printed acetate film (gunsight reflectors) and two parts in grey resin.

 

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With such a modest parts count, this should be a fast build.

Surface detail still looks good more than 16 years after the kit's initial release. Panel lines are crisp and fine.

Exterior detail is really good too. Even though the main wheel wells are moulded as part of the lower wing, the jumble of hydraulic lines and electrical cabling is outstanding. The interior of the main gear doors look great too.

 

 

Cockpit detail is pretty much what you would expect for a turn-of-the-century Hasegawa release but Eduard boosts the detail with a lovely two-part resin seat and cushion set.

 

 

Added to this is a colour photo-etched fret, most of which is destined for the cockpit. The instrument panel, side consoles and harness straps will make a huge inpact in this important area.

If you wish, you can also replace a number of key detail areas on the kit's exterior, including nose gear door hinges and main undercarriage legs.

 

 

The clear parts are thin and free from distortion. The windscreen is moulded separately so you can display all that lovely resin and photo-etched detail under an open canopy if you wish.

 

 

The fuselage air brakes are separate parts that may be posed open or closed. An optional pilot's boarding ladder is included too.

Although the box art shows the Skyhawk with a full bomb and rocket load, Hasegawa's typically stingy sprues supply no ordnance.

However, two drop tanks are provided.


 

Markings

One marking scheme for each aircraft is included on the large decal sheet.

 

 

Stencil markings are included on the same large sheet, printed by Eduard. Eduard's decals have always been trouble free in their application for me.

As usual, Eduard has supplied self-adhesive die-cut masks for the canopy and wheels of both models.



 

Conclusion

 

This is a pleasing package - Eduard's unique take on the "dogfight doubles" concept that now includes two great kits plus attractive artwork from Koike Shigeo.

In terms of accuracy and surface textures, the Hasegawa Skyhawk remains a very good kit despite its vintage. The additon of Eduard colour photo-etch plus the resin seat lifts the cockpit several notches in the detail department; while the MiG-21PFM, along with the rest of the Eduard Fishbed family, still stands head and shoulders above other MiG-21ss in this scale.

It is nice to see them together in the one box.

Highly Recommended.

Thanks to Eduard for the sample


Review Text and Images Copyright 2016 by Brett Green
Page Created 26 September, 2016
Last updated 27 September, 2016

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