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Fiat G.55 Centauro
Two Kits in the Box

Sword, 1/72 scale

S u m m a r y

Description and Catalogue Number: Sword Kit No. SW72104 – Fiat G.55 Centauro
Scale: 1/72
Contents and Media:

Two full kits in the box. Each comprise 49 parts in grey plastic, two parts in clear and one resin part. Decals are provided for seven options.

Price:

Available online from these stockists:

Review Type: FirstLook
Advantages: High quality moulding; two tails supplied for different versions; good level of detail; fine recessed surface textures; seven varied and interesting schemes.
Disadvantages:

 

Conclusion:

Sword's kits are limited run but the quality of moulding, the level of detail and the finesse of surface textures would challenge some mainstream injection moulding mode companies.

Sword's 1/72 scale Fiat G.55 is a lovely little kit. The bonus of two kits in one box just makes the choice between the seven interesting and colourful marking options that little bit easier!

 

Reviewed by Brett Green


Airfix's 1/48 scale Spitfire Mk. Vb will be available online from Squadron.com

Introduction

 

The Fiat G.55 Centauro (Italian: "Centaur") was a single-engine single-seat World War II fighter aircraft used by the Regia Aeronautica and the A.N.R. (Aeronautica Nazionale Repubblicana) in 1943–1945. It was designed and built in Turin by Fiat.

The Fiat G.55 was arguably the best type produced in Italy during World War II, (a subjective claim also frequently made for the Macchi C.205 Veltro as well as for the Reggiane Re.2005 "Sagittario") but it did not enter production until 1943, when, after comparative tests against the Messerschmitt Bf 109G and the Focke-Wulf 190, the Luftwaffe itself regarded the Fiat G.55 as "the best Axis fighter".

 

 

During its short operational service, mostly under the Repubblica Sociale Italiana insignia, after the 8 September 1943 armistice, this powerful, robust and fast aircraft proved itself to be an excellent interceptor at high altitude. In 1944, over Northern Italy, the Centauro clashed with British Supermarine Spitfire, P-51 Mustang, P-47 Thunderbolt and P-38 Lightning, proving to be no easy adversary.

Italian fighter pilots liked their Centauro but by the time the war ended, fewer than 300 had been built. By comparison, the Germans produced 34,000 Bf 109s.*

* Historical summary courtesy of Wikipedia.

 

 

FirstLook

 

Sword is a limited-run model company from the Czech Republic that mainly focuses on 1/72 scale kits.

Their latest new-tool release is a Fiat G.55 Centauro. This kit has nothing in common with the 1/72 scale Special Hobby Centauro released around 2005.

Sword's 1/72 scale Fiat G.55 package includes two full kits. Each kit comprises 49 parts in grey plastic, two parts in clear plastic plus one resin part. The package is rounded out with markings for seven varied and interesting options.

 

  • Sword Kit No. SW72104  Fiat G.55 Centauro Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Sword Kit No. SW72104  Fiat G.55 Centauro Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Sword Kit No. SW72104  Fiat G.55 Centauro Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Sword Kit No. SW72104  Fiat G.55 Centauro Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Sword Kit No. SW72104  Fiat G.55 Centauro Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Sword Kit No. SW72104  Fiat G.55 Centauro Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Sword Kit No. SW72104  Fiat G.55 Centauro Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Sword Kit No. SW72104  Fiat G.55 Centauro Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Sword Kit No. SW72104  Fiat G.55 Centauro Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Sword Kit No. SW72104  Fiat G.55 Centauro Review by Brett Green: Image
  • Sword Kit No. SW72104  Fiat G.55 Centauro Review by Brett Green: Image
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The grey plastic parts for each kit are moulded on a single sprue with fine attachment points. Being a limited run kit, there are none of the little luxuries such as locating pins and tabs, so take time when aligning and gluing the plastic parts.

Surface textures, including recessed panel lines and subtle rib tapes on fabric control surfaces, are subtly done.

 

 

Detail of the seven-piece plastic cockpit is good too, although you'll have to source your own harness straps. Eduard offers a nice 1/72 scale set of Italian belts in the STEEL series.

A a single small resin part delivers the exposed lower rear engine in the centre of the main undercarrige bay.

 

 

Two vertical tails are provided for two different versions. The optional tail will require that you cut off the tail moulded to the fuselage.

 

 

The clear parts are acceptably thin in this scale. The windscreen is a separate part so the canopy may be posed open if you wish.

 

 

Markings are provided for seven ANR options.

 

 

The decals are suplied on three sheets (one is an errata sheet to replace the national markings on the main sheet).

 

 

They are printed by Techmodand appear to be in good register.

 

 

Conclusion

 

Sword's kits are limited run but the quality of moulding, the level of detail and the finesse of surface textures would challenge some mainstream injection moulding mode companies.

Sword's 1/72 scale Fiat G.55 is a lovely little kit. The bonus of two kits in one box just makes the choice between the seven interesting and colourful marking options that little bit easier!

Thanks to Sword Models for the review samples.


Text and Images Copyright © 2017 by Brett Green
Page Created 18 October, 2017
Last updated 18 October, 2017

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