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Messerschmitt Bf 109G-10

by Larry Cherniak

 

Messerschmitt Bf 109G-10

 

 

Introduction

 

So much has been written on HyperScale about the late model Messerschmitt Bf109, and even the old 1/48 Revell kit used here, that I won't bore you with too many details. 

This model was an important breakthrough for me, though, as it represents "my triumphant return to the hobby!" (Sound effect: blast of horns here). This was the first good representation I built on coming back to modeling after a 21-year absence. 

 

 

Naturally, I started back on some of the classic American kits I had wanted to build long ago like this one, the Typhoon and Mosquito. I was thrilled to discover that the 21-year gap was not time wasted in terms of skill development, but to the contrary I had accumulated a lifetime of valuable experience. The positive feedback I got taking this model to shows gave me the impetus to move on into the hobby again in high gear.

 

 

Construction

 

This kit was originally built out-of-box with just drilled-out exhausts and scoops, thinned exhaust shields, and photoetch seatbelts. Later I added the drain tube to the oil cooler, control rods to the radiator openings, canopy wire, and a carved toothpick for the radio aerial post. 

 

 

 

Painting and Markings

 

Paints were Modelmaster and Floquil Military Colors oil-based enamels, scale lightened with white and faded through uneven application over the light gray primer.

The paint scheme was taken from a profile in Beaman's "Last of the Eagles" and a photo in Hitchcock's "Messerschmitt '09 Gallery" with decals from various sheets in my collection. It is simply identified as a craft of II/JG?, so if anyone knows of any new info since these were published let me know. 

 

 

Imagine my surprise when, after my research and attempt to model a unique subject, I came upon an original 1970's issue of this kit at a swap meet with decals for just this craft!

 

 

Conclusion

 

I recommend picking these kits up cheap and using them as displays of late-war camo schemes. 

 

 

Cockpit detail is Spartan but the outline is accurate and replacement of the tailwheel with a taller one will open up many marking possibilities. I even have a set of decals for a Russian Liberation Army captured craft...hmmm... maybe next year...


Model, Text and Images Copyright 2000 by Larry Cherniak
Page Created 02 December, 2000
Last Updated 26 July, 2007

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